Rusty Considerations/ Размышления о ржавом

ru01

Painting and staining are the two processes closest to Dyeing. Staining does not involve chemical combination of a dye with the fiber, and usually quickly washes out. Painting involves the application of insoluble pigment, suspended in a liquid binder, to a surface. Mordants, i.e. metal salts, tannins, and oxyfatty acids, are necessary to effect chemical combination. Also, polychromatic effects of many dyes result from the metal-dye complexIron is one of the assistants that are usually used by home dyers. Since unconventional methods of the use of natural dye stuffs have effused within recent years among enthusiasts with no special training, an improvised approach to natural dyeing became prevalent. Iron oxide, i.e. Rust, has been widely used while common iron salts mordants have been avoided.

In arts, rust is associated with images of faded glory; rust is a commonly used metaphor, so, no wonder that it attracts artsy minds. The rich texture of rusted flaked surface awakes imagination; antiqued tools always add flair to an interior… So, as the Contact dyeing/extraction ideas and ‘bundles era’ emerged in modern dyeing history, naturally rusted cans gained the affection of amateur dyers providing the short cut to vivid extraction results. While at conventional use of natural dyes you got to do calculations following the ratio, know the stuffs and conditions, etc., employment of a rusted can provides an oportunity to ‘play’ which is also a very popular attitude to dyeing these days. However, since dyeing involves the chemical combination of molecules of the stuffs, it is really worth looking deeper and knowing and understanding what you are working with.

Rust is the result of iron corrosion. Corrosion is the destructive attack of a metal through interaction with its environment. So, whenever contact extraction is conducted at immediate contact with rusty surfaces, whether it is a bundle rolled over a can, or an antique cast iron grating or a farmer’s tool, it is iron oxide that gets settled on the fibers. Rust imprints can be really awesome because of that powerful faded glory imagery and figurativeness… The only problem with an art work created via real rust is its evanescence, and not in a metaphorical way. Very soon, depending upon the exact environmental conditions, rust will expand and holes will add to the overall design of the piece. A wall art can benefit from some expressive hole up to some point, but degradation will go on… As for a wearable piece holes are beyond desirable; skin contact with iron oxide itself should be by all means avoided health wise. Rust’s effect on human skin is a quite harmfull. Rust reacts with substances in human body, it interacts with a cell membrane and damages the cell. Damage from rust is continuous and constant.

In former times, iron mordants were often in form of ‘iron liquors’, i.e. iron dissolved in nitric, hydrochloric, and acetic acids. Handling and working with strong acids calls for dyers with proper chemical training. However, today it is a very common approach to prepare home-made iron liquor by soaking rusty bits in vinegar solution. For that purpose people collect rusty objects elsewhere on the sidewalks, on the ground picking up and brining home lots of perfectly imperfect beautifully aged objects… Probably it is time we remember that porous surface of rust presents excellent habitat for all sorts of bacteria, Tetanus for instance is one of them. Bacteria play important roles in the global ecosystem, but this fact does not downplay healthhazards that many bacteria constitute for human health. High level of bacteria is usually present around rust, especially when it is in solution, which means that there are higher than average chances of getting infection from contact with rusty objects and from those vinegar ‘iron water’ solutions.

So, one should always be aware of the fact that when wandering around and picking up stuff from the ground one can very well get a real natural health hazard and introduce it to his home. Today, when eco-awareness seems to more and more be a trendy label attached to an amateurish dyeing work, it is worth reminding that not everything which comes from the Nature is safe to play with, equally not all stuffs of synthetic origin are evil and health hazardous.

In this regard, artisans who never stop improving and polishing up their knowledge of the background technology and principles of chemistry gain my highest respect and admiration.

ru03 ru04

Over a year ago I made a probe with direct contact of a nicely rusted iron plates. I got steel plates brand new and developed rust on the surfaces which were applied to silk fabric. These are photos of the rusted silk fabric which I have just taken.

***Более года назад я поставила эту пробу при прямом контакте с ржавыми пластинами. Когда новые стальные пластины корродировали, я применила их в контакте с шелком. Эти фото сделаны сейчас.  

ru05 ru06 ru11

The colors are nice and vivid. However, the rusty areas have obviously expanded and it looks like soon holes will soon appear. ***Цвета выразительны и разнообразны. Однако, область ржавчины очевидно разрослась, и вот вот появятся дыры.

ru07 ru08 ru09 ru10

 

The process of ‘rusting’ can be slowed down on cloth, however, every 6 months you should repeat the procedure. Anyway, I can hardly imagine how one should take a piece of wall art off the wall and treat it with a solution… I’ll keep watching after my rusty probes and measuring the fiber damage. Although the colors and effects of  ‘faded glory’ on fibers really heat the imagination. But should be sealed under the glass.

***Процесс образования ржавчины на ткани можно затормозить, при этом производить обработку нужно будет примерно каждые 6 месяцев. Однако, я слабо представляю, кто захочет в принципе регулярно снимать произведение со стены для обработки… Я продолжу наблюдение за образцами и замеры повреждения волокна. Тем не менее, ржавые эффекты в колорите будят воображение. Однако, любоваться ими лучше через стекло.

ru12

 

Рисовать и пачкать – два наиболее близких к крашению процесса. При пачкании вещества химически не связываются, таким образом при стирке пятна отходят. Рисуют красками, т.е. нерастворимый пигмент, взвешенный в жидком связующем, наносится на поверхность. Для того, чтобы вещества связались химически, необходимо при помощи протрав (соли металлов, таннины, жирные кислоты) включить механизм реакции. Одновременно с этим, соли металлов позволяют получить полихроматический колорит.

Железо – одно из наиболее популярных веществ у красильщиков на дому. Поскольку за последнее время неортодоксальные методы натурального крашения получили среди энтузиастов большую популярность, импровизированный подход к крашению оказался широко распространен. Вместо обычных солей железа, традиционно используемых в крашении, любители предпочитают использовать оксид железа, т.е. ржавчину. В мире художественных образов ржавая поверхность обладает несомненным потенциалом, ассоциируясь с увядающим величием и бренностью сущего, и безусловно будоражит воображение. Антикварные предметы, тронутые ржавчиной, могут создать определенный флер в интерьерном дизайне… С распространением идей контактной экстракции и возникновении «эры бандлов» – накрученных на основу и сваренных в кастрюле тканей – ржавые жестянки стали необходимым атрибутом, позволяющим при любительском подходе получить некую внятность и ясность следов экстракции.

В то время, как при технологичном натуральном крашении необходимо делать расчеты, знать вещества и т.д., применение простой ржавой жестянки позволяет просто «поиграть» наобум, что также является характерным подходом в любительском крашении сегодня. Однако, поскольку крашение все же происходит в результате химических процессов, стоит посмотреть глубже и вдуматься, с чем мы имеем дело.

Ржавчина является результатом коррозии железа. Коррозия – это своего рода деструктивная реакция металлов в результате взаимодействия со средой. В результате экстракции, проведенной при непосредственном контакте с ржавой поверхностью, будь то поверхность жестянки, на которую намотали ткань, или антикварная вентиляционная решетка, используемая ради оттиска кованого узора, именно оксид железа в результате оказывается на волокне материала. Следы и узоры, оставленные ржавчиной, на самом деле бывают очень выразительны и эффективны для создания художественного образа… Единственная проблема произведения со следами ржавчины это его недолговечность в прямом смысле слова. Через непродолжительное время, в зависимости от конкретных условий среды, ржавчина разрастется, оставляя дыры. Разумеется, стильное произведение может только выиграть от нескольких экспрессивных дыр. Однако, деструкция будет продолжаться и далее… Что касается элементов одежды, то дыры не являются желательной особенностью с самого начала. Контакт же кожи со ржавой поверхностью является недопустимым и должен быть исключен по причине опасности для здоровья. Воздействие ржавчины на организм губительно, т.к. ржавчина, вступая во взаимодействие, повреждает клеточную мембрану. Воздействие от ржавчины длительное и непрекращающееся. 

В прошедшие времена, в старину, протравы железа применялись в форме растворов в азотной, соляной и уксусной кислот. Работа с концентрированными кислотами требует от красильщика основательной профессиональной подготовки. Сегодня же стало популярным применение домащней “железной воды”, которую получают, настаивая ржавые предметы в подкисленной уксусом воде. С этой целью энтузиасты отыскиваю и подбирают ржавые предметы. Многие коллекционируют прекрасные в своем несовершенстве объекты с историей, тронутые ржавчиной… Полагаю, стоит напомнить о том, что пористая поверхность ржавчины представляет собой наилучшее место для процветания огромного количества бактерий, возбудитель столбняка живет там же. Бактерии играют огромную роль в экосистеме земли. Однако, это никак не может преуменьшить пагубное влияние и опасность, которую многие из них представляют для организма человека. Ржавчина привлекает большое количество бактерий, предоставляет им благоприятную среду, особенно в водном растворе, таким образом, вероятность заразиться возрастает в разы и особенно при использовании водных настоев.

Хотелось бы напомнить, что находясь на прогулке и подбирая с земли материалы для натурального крашения, по неведению можно принести с собой домой настоящую биологическую угрозу, вполне натуральную. Сегодня, когда можно наблюдать, как эко -ориентированность все больше становится некой этикеткой, прикрепленной к дилетантской работе по крашению, самое время напомнить о том, что не все, что имеет натуральное происхождение является безопасным и полезным, в равной степени как и все синтетическое и ненатуральное не является опасным и вредным. В этой связи, творцы, не устающие повышать свой уровень информированности и квалификации, изучающие основы технологии и химический знаний, вызывают однозначное одобрение и восхищениеХХХХ

 

Advertisements

11 responses to “Rusty Considerations/ Размышления о ржавом

  • naiveslowfeltfashion

    Reblogged this on NAÏVE Slow Felt Fashion and commented:
    Interesting information for natural dyers and printers…

  • Amanda

    Another great article on safety where you have really highlighted a major problem! Personally, I have no problem with work continuing to degrade over time. If rust is an aspect of a work, I see this process as enhancing the conceptual statement of the work. Nothing lasts forever, regardless of our desire for it to be otherwise. The issue of handling such items and rust dust entering a home environment is an entirely different and very serious issue, and as you say, rarely if ever discussed in more than a cursory way.

  • arlee

    i can’t believe how prevalent the “it’s natural so it’s safe” attitude STILL is!! i wash my hands frequently, wear gloves, and a mask and am very careful about eating and drinking around or near the dyepots, and i’ve had a tetanus booster several times in the last 40+ years (something every floral designer should be aware of as well–roses can have tetanus on the thorns!). I’ve seen people reach into pots with no protection, i’ve seen them smell the vapours, drop and step on rusty bits, the list goes on…….when i studied textile arts in the 90’s we were never told about wearing masks or the hazards procion can cause–it’s scarey but if people would just use common sense!

  • morgenmaker

    You are so right about the need for paying attention to the materials we employ – contact with rust can make you very sick indeed and it’s use requires care and respect just like the dust factor in fiber reactive dye and the use of hot beeswax in batik work (another so called natural process with some serious health implications). This being said I live in an area filled with rusted artifacts and as an artist I am very attracted to the inclusion of them in my work. Balancing the scale between reasonable care and artistic adventure has always been a challenge for the curious artist. Thank you for your post. I always appreciate your sobering insight Elena.

    • theimportanceofprocrastination

      You are absolutely right as for the dust factor and hot wax in batik! I am a batik artist too, and also have huge experience with fiber reactive dyes. In my early days of being a textile artist I met a few people, older artists who were experiencing bad health problems due to their neglect to the safety precautions: one working with fiber reactive dyes, the other few because of poor ventilation when working with wax. Back then I first started taking health safety seriously in my studio.
      Later, when I entered post graduate studies in chemical technologies I was introduced to chemical lab organization and safety arrangements…

      And what I have been watching lately is that people tend to neglect or underestimate some real hazards, while exaggerating and panicing about false alarms…

      Thank you once again!

  • debbie.weaver

    Fascinating post, there has been a lot of back and forth on blogs about the merits of rust dyeing and its longevitiy but perhaps not so much on its health effects. Saying that I never use it on anything that is likely to be handled very much by other people.
    You have certainly acheived some beautiful results.
    Do you mind if I reference this on my blog as we had a discussion going on a while back about rust and I feel some of my followers would be very interested in this.
    Thanks

    • theimportanceofprocrastination

      Thank you, Debbie. I’ll appreciate it if you refer to this post in your discussion.
      The fact is that these issues I dwelled upon in this publication are rarely mentioned, if ever, even by some experienced dyers/teachers. And it is real gap I believe.

      Thanks!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Pale Rook

Textile Art by Johanna Flanagan

Janice Paine Dawes @ Wilde Thistle Gallery

Fine Art Textile Gallery and Studio

Obovate Designs™

My dabbling and exploration in contact printing, natural dyeing, and soap making

sharity4

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

Priscilla Jones

priscilla@priscillajones.co.uk

Felting,stitching and embellishing fibres

Felting by author,designer Chrissie Day

Local & Bespoke

think globally, craft locally

Sea Green and Sapphire

A blog about a love of colour, addiction to fabrics and joy of crafting...

Friends... French... France...

A topnotch WordPress.com site

h..... the blog

a blog of art, photography and all the adventures inbetween

Conny Niehoff-Malerei

und lebens K U N S T

SERENDIPITY

Searching for intelligent life on earth

Down to Earth

bits and snippets on fiber, mud and life as I know it

Ecofren F & B Community

Blog is about yummy,delicious,tasty....it includes food reviews,food history, recipes, reports and food fun.

Danny Mansmith

picture diary

The Little Green Dress Projekt

Wear it and Compost it

Natural Dye Workshop with Michel Garcia and Sustainable Dye Practice

A film series and discussion forum dedicated to the science and practice of natural dyes and pigments using sustainable methods.

Threadborne

Fibre Art, Eco Printing, Artists' Books, Vintage Textiles

Crazy Coats of Many Colors

Using Crazy Quilt Techniques

gracefully50

On your birthday: count your candles, count your years, count your blessings.

obBLOGato

a Photo Blog, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to dear dirty New York

Happy Doodles

A doodle a day keeps the blues away

%d bloggers like this: